Paul Lustig Dunkel, Live in Concert Flute and Piano


CD Recording from New York City in 2006.



review by Greg Henry Waters

http://www.greghenrywaters.com



One of the outstanding flute CD's of our time. He starts out with the Bach Solo Partita in A minor, first movement, Allemande.


I was so struck by this performance because he really allows himself to be free from the traditional kind of phrasing. He starts out bold and forceful for the first two phrases and then calms down for the next phrase and even slows down the tempo, so much variety in such a short time. Then he uses the tempo guide of poco a poco and increases the tempo and crescendo at the same time. I never heard this before this kind of playing with this piece. He allows himself maximum freedom to express himself with this piece. So different

an amazing from Rampal's recording and Sir James Galway, for Paul found a new way of performing this piece.


Http://www.greghenrywaters.com/flute/01FlutePartita.m4a


This may download the file to your computer or play it.



He uses the retard, crescendo, acceleration diminuendo, all of the phrasing tools to express the true and dynamic nature of this great solo piece by J.S. Bach. His credits go on and on just read some parts of his bio. I asked Paul to write something about his performances and he refused saying it would not be honest. So here I am, Greg Henry Waters writing my opinions about this humble man and great musician and flutist.


At the same time beginning his career as a flutist in New York City. Over his career, he played with many free-lance orchestras, operas and ballet companies he appeared at some of the world's leading music festivals.

Dunkel's interest in contemporary music led him to conducting. He has since been Music Director of the Denver Chamber Orchestra, Principal Guest Conductor of the Vermont Mozart Festival and has appeared with the Denver, Baltimore, Buffalo, New Jersey, Oakland, Syracuse and Richmond Symphonies, as well with the Brooklyn Philharmonic, American Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra of St. Luke's and Musica Aeterna.

Dunkel has also taught at the New England Conservatory, the Eastman School of Music, Queens College, Vassar College, the University of Connecticut and the College at Purchase (SUNY). In 1978, Dunkel co-founded the American Composers Orchestra In 1989, he was appointed Resident Conductor. In 1983, Dunkel founded the New Orchestra of Westchester, an ensemble devoted to the performance of the classics as well as newly commissioned works. The orchestra's educational endeavors included a program that created a syllabus for elementary school children that was taught by Westchester's school music teachers in collaboration with members of the Philharmonic. In 1998, Dunkel and the orchestra commissioned the composer Melinda Wagner to write a flute concerto for the orchestra's 20th anniversary. The work won the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for Music.

Getting back to the music as I listen to this first movement. Paul allows himself to breath and not rush through the piece which I have heard so many flutist do. For Paul the music comes first this is what makes him so special and not just another flutist.



His lower tones are big and loud but not overstated to show off his tone. For like I said, “the music comes first and not the show off style of so many flutist” or maybe just a few flutist who want to show off their big tone, which is so important to this instrument besides.

Second Movement, in the Corrente, he uses the same basic technique that he used in the first movement, so his style is set in this piece with a strong foundation of the interpretation. Again, He uses the retard, crescendo, acceleration diminuendo, all of the phrasing tools to express the true and dynamic nature of this great solo piece by J.S. Bach. Remember this is a live recording and not a studio recording where one can overdub all the minor flaws in the tone, phrasing, tempo, breathing, sound and dynamics. Which makes it even more amazing especially when he only performs recitals maybe once or twice a year. Remember solo violinist perform about five concertos in their entire career so the piece is so part of themselves that it is difficult not to perform at the highest level, which orchestral musicians are at a disadvantage if one thinks about it.

Http://www.greghenrywaters.com/flute/02FlutePartita.m4a

This may download the file to your computer or play it.


Sarabante: He starts out slow, soft and sad and increases the tempo just a little but falls back into the slower mode. He cuts down on the vibrato makes it slower and softer too. Then he puts more emotion into the performance and tone to make the music a stronger statement.

But falls back into the softer mood always remembering the true intent of the phrasing he wants to express. He ends it on a soft long note to express the first statement to complete the true nature of the phrasing.

Http://www.greghenrywaters.com/flute/03FlutePartita.m4a

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The Bouree Anglise: fourth movement, which is a short little piece, not having the texture of the second and third movements but more a repeat of the first movement. And it is only 2 minutes the shortest movement in the Sonata.

Http://www.greghenrywaters.com/flute/04FlutePartita.m4a

This may download the file to your computer or play it.


The CD has Five Composers on it, Bach, Briccialdi, Debussy, Di Domenica and Van Brink all outstanding flute works and Dunkel shines maybe even more on these pieces. But this can be so subjective and music is so subjective in the first place, especially with modern contemporary music. You can buy the cd at this location. http://www.msrcd.com/catalog/cd/MS1198

I so hope you enjoyed this short review of the recording, Live in Recital, 2006. Paul Dunkel also recorded a Concerto by Melinda Wagner called the Concerto for Flute , Strings, and Percussion. Number is 9040-49098-2